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MSW Coursework and Syllabi

Generalist Curriculum Courses

All students, except those with baccalaureate degrees from programs accredited by the Council on Social Work Education, are required to take all of the generalist curriculum courses. These courses contain a body of knowledge, values, and skills essential for social work practice. This common base is transferable among settings, population groups, and problems areas. The generalist curriculum consists of courses in generalist social work practice with corresponding field instruction, human behavior and the social environment, psychopathology, introductory social work research methods, social welfare policy and services, and a course focused on diversity and oppression. Successful completion of the generalist program is required before beginning the specialized curriculum.

Course

  • 19:910:500 Social Work Practice I with Individuals, Families, and Groups (3)

    This is the first half of two required sequential courses in the generalist curriculum. It provides the basic knowledge and skills as a foundation for the specialized curriculum. Using a problem-solving model in an ecological perspective, the course prepares students to apply a generalist practice perspective to systems of all sizes and levels. Essential values, concepts, and ethical considerations as they pertain to generalist social work practice are explored. Co-requisite: 19:910:508

    View Syllabus (432.94 KB)
  • 19:910:501 Social Work Practice II with Organizations and Communities (3)

    The second of two practice courses based on a generalist social work perspective, this course continues use of a problem-solving model for work with organization and community systems and considers implications for at-risk groups. Pre-requisite: 19:910:500. Co-requisite: 19:910:509.

    View Syllabus (338.61 KB)
  • 19:910:502 Human Behavior and the Social Environment (3)

    Theories, themes, and issues concerning the ongoing interaction between people as they grow, change, and develop over the life course and the social context in which this occurs. Assumptions about human behavior that may interfere with recognition of diversity in the ongoing interaction between individual, family, and group identity; social context; and social life. Values and ethical issues related to biopsychosocial development.

    View Syllabus (231.85 KB)
  • 19:910:504 Social Welfare Policy and Services I (3)

    History, philosophy, and development of social welfare as an essential institution in the United States. Study of the emergence and role of social work, understanding of patterns of current provision, and introduction to analysis of social welfare policies.

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  • 19:910:505 Methods of Social Work Research I (3)

    Introduction to scientific, analytic approach to building knowledge and skills, including role of concepts and theory, hypothesis formulation, operationalization, research design, data collection, data processing, statistical analysis, introductory computer skills, and report writing.

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  • 19:910:506 Diversity and Oppression (3)

    Introduces a range of diverse populations by race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and physical differences. Additionally, it examines the role, function, and effects of oppression in society as it relates to social and economic justice. Assumptions underlying theory and research methodologies from which basic constructs of human behavior are drawn will be examined to understand how power and other dynamics manage and sustain oppression at the individual and institutional levels. Also of interest is how oppression affects service delivery at micro and macro levels, particularly social policies and strategic planning which drive the shape of services.

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  • 19:910:507 Psychopathology (3)

    Major forms of emotional distress in adults and children. Classification trends, issues, and models. Introduction to clinical syndromes in terms of diagnostic methodology, research, and social concerns and their implications for at-risk groups.

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  • 19:910:508 Field Education Practicum I (3)

    Practice social work in agency settings under qualified educational supervision. Includes service to vulnerable and oppressed populations while learning generalist skills. Co-requisite: 19:910:500.

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  • 19:910:509 Field Education PracticumII (3)

    Furthers learning of problem-solving skills and strategies begun in Field Education Practicum I and prepares students to enter the advanced field curriculum. Pre-requisite: 19:910:508. Corequisite: 19:910:501.

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Specialized Curriculum

The specialized curriculum consists of a specialization in a method of advanced practice, an advanced research course, advanced field instruction, and electives. Only after successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses and the statistics requirement can students begin the specialized curriculum. Students must select a specialization of either Clinical Social Work or Nonprofit and Public Management.

Course

  • 19:910:511 Clinical Social Work I (3)

    Focuses on advanced social work, clinical and client advocacy skills and techniques at each stage of the helping process, and with difficult practice situations as these apply to individuals, client groups, couples, and family systems. Case examples are drawn particularly from the client populations. Prerequisites: Successful completion of generalist curriculum courses. Corequisite: Must be taken concurrently with Field Education Practicum III (19:910:600).

    This is the advanced practice course for students that have selected the Clinical Social Work specialization.

    View Syllabus (426.04 KB)
  • 19:910:512 Clinical Social Work II (3)

    This course addresses therapeutic work with couples, families and groups. The focus is on the professional use of self in differentiated ways to enhance therapeutic outcomes. Reinforcement of the connections among theory, evidence-based practice, interventions and culturally appropriate and anti-oppressive stances toward social work practice occurs. Prerequisite: 19:910:511. Corequisite: Must be taken concurrently with Field Education Practicum IV (19:910:601).

    This is the advanced practice course for students that have selected the Clinical Social Work specialization.

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  • 19:910:535 Management Practice and Theory (3)

    Core theories, elements, and functions of human services management are analyzed with a particular focus on the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to lead public and private human service agencies in the environment of today and the future successfully. Emphasis on internal management functions, such as budget and finance, human resource administration, applications of information technology, and governance relationships; and on external functions, such as legislative, media, and community relationships. Crosscutting topics enhance skills in leadership, mediation, and conflict resolution. Prerequisites: Successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses. Corequisite: Must be taken concurrently with Field Education Practicum III (19:910:600).

    This is the advanced practice course for students that have selected the Management and Policy specialization.

  • 19:910:536 Program and Strategic Planning (3)

    Processes and technologies of strategic planning and program development in human service organizations from problem formulation through program design, resource mobilization, and implementation. Special attention to designing programs and meeting the needs of at-risk populations. Prerequisite: 19:910:535. Corequisite: Must be taken concurrently with Field Education Practicum IV (19:910:601).

    This is the advanced practice course for students that have selected the Management and Policy specialization.

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  • 19:910:542 Social Welfare Policy and Services II (3)

    19:910:542 Social Welfare Policy and Services II: Health and Aging (3)

    Models of policy analysis applied to understanding the strengths and limitations of the U.S. health care system and services, as well as policies, programs, and services for the aging population. Addresses understanding of values and sociopolitical forces that define problems, affected populations, current policies and programs and their impact, service delivery and resource allocation, unmet needs, trends and analysis of political processes, and change strategies. Prerequisites: Successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses.

    This course meets the Social Welfare Policy and Services II requirement.

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  • 19:910:565 Field Education Practicum III AS (3)

    Opportunities provided to become competent in providing advanced social work services and applying theory and concepts to practice in preparation for advanced professional practice.  Corequisite:  To be taken concurrently with 19:910:512 (Clinical Social Work specialization) or 19:910:536 (Management and Policy specialization.)

  • 19:910:584 Social Welfare Policy and Services II: Violence against Women and Children (3)

    Models of analysis applied to policies affecting adult and childhood survivors of physical, sexual, and other forms of violence. Addresses understanding of values and sociopolitical forces that define problems, affected populations, current policies and programs and their impact, service delivery and resource allocation, unmet needs, trends, and analysis of political processes and change strategies. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses.

    This course meets the Social Welfare Policy and Services II requirement.

  • 19:910:585 Social Welfare Policy and Services II (3)

    Models of policy analysis applied to social welfare issues and problems. Addresses understanding of values and socio-political forces that define problems; affected populations; current policies and programs and their impact, along with  their unintended consequences; service delivery and resource allocation; unmet needs; trends; analysis of political processes and change strategies; and the role of evaluation.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses.

  • 19:910:595 Methods of Social Work Research II (3)

    Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of agency programs and individual practice. Participation in hands-on, small-group research projects to cover all phases of the research process, and use of computer technology. Prerequisites: Successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses.

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  • 19:910:600 Field Education Practicum III (3)

    Opportunities provided to become competent in providing advanced social work services and applying theory and concepts to practice in preparation for advanced professional practice. Prerequisites: Successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses and 19:910:509. Specialization specific. To be taken concurrently with 19:910:511 (Clinical Social Work specialization) or 19:910:535 (Management and Policy specialization). Placement is determined by choice of specialization.

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  • 19:910:601 Field Education Practicum IV (3)

    Continued learning experiences in specialized settings in preparation for advanced professional practice. Prerequisites: 19:910:600. To be taken concurrently with 19:910:512 (Clinical Social Work specialization) or 19:910:536 (Management and Policy specialization).

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  • 19:910:800 Matriculation Continued (0)

    May be used only if a student has a written, official leave of absence granted by the associate dean for student affairs.  Students may not take a leave of absence during the first semester of the program.

Electives

Three general elective courses are required to complete the MSW program. Any elective offered through the School of Social Work meets the general elective requirement. Typically, students complete one general elective in the Generalist Curriculum  and two in the Specialized Curriculum.

Students may take general elective courses at any point in the program. Only after successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses and the statistics requirement are students eligible to take advanced electives.  Students should review course descriptions for additional pre- or corequisites for elective courses.

Students are also required to complete a Human Behavior Distribution Requirement and Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement course (see course descriptions or review  "Curriculum at a Glance" for a list of electives that meet these requirements).

Generalist Curriculum Electives

*also meets one of the distribution requirements

Course

  • 19:910:515 Financial Capabilities of Individuals, Families, and Communities

    This course examines ways to improve the financial stability and security of low-income individuals, families, and communities in the United States. Students will learn the difference between income assistance and asset-based policies, which aim to help individuals and families build savings and acquire assets that will improve their financial security over the long-term. Historical patterns of institutionalized racism and oppression largely explain racial wealth disparities that justify asset development as a practice and policy strategy to achieve social and economic justice. This course uses a comprehensive approach to examine social programs and direct practice interventions, financial services, and policies that can move individuals, families, and communities along the asset-building continuum. The impact of issues such as life stage, social class, and cultural background will be examined. Policy issues include social insurance programs, savings, consumer protection, tax credits, public benefits, and innovative programs; practice issues include financial assessment and goal setting, financial coaching, and integrating financial interventions with traditional psychosocial interventions.

  • 19:910:531 Children’s Mental Health Services

    This course is designed to promote critical thinking about children’s mental health services that support the development of effective programs, services and treatment for children’s mental health. It introduces students to the nature and scope of mental health problems for youth in the United States, and examines the mental health delivery system for them, with particular attention to the influential system of care model developed in New Jersey and throughout the United States.  Students will explore clinical and programmatic complexities of engagement and collaboration, service utilization, and treatment interventions, and will investigate the persistent problem of disparities in, and barriers to, mental health care.  This course aims to introduce students to mental health problems of children, and system of care principles, as well as prepare them for leadership roles in practice and policy in children’s mental health services in New Jersey and other states in the nation.   

  • 19:910:533 Special Topics in Social Work Research

    19:910:533 Special Topics in Social Work Research: Military Culture: Life and Issues

    This course provides an extensive exploration of the world of being a service member and the unique culture and socialization that takes place in this process: the values, norms, language, rank as caste system, military justice, family life and being a “dependent” [wife, husband or child]. The course includes the preparing for the war zone and training to become ready for combat missions for the service member: adjusting to uncertainty, killing others, death, bonding and fighting for each other, and shear tension of being always on alert and aware. Material on potential means for building resiliency prior to facing combat/trauma for service members and deployment for families, including children.

    19:910:533 Special Topics in Social Work Research: Perinatal Death, Dying, and Bereavement

    Pregnancy loss and infant death can be devastating and traumatic events for women and their families, with potentially serious implications for one’s physical and mental health. This course will examine the biopsychosocial aspects of perinatal death (pregnancy and newborn loss) by exploring the impact on women and their families who experience perinatal death, dying and bereavement. This course approaches perinatal death through an interdisciplinary lens by integrating works from the applied health (genetics, medicine, nursing) and behavioral health (psychiatry, psychology, social work) professions, and by drawing from knowledge spanning a variety of disciplines in the social sciences (anthropology, sociology), arts and humanities (history, literature, philosophy/bioethics, women’s studies, theology). Of particular relevance for students in, or planning to enter, the applied professions of health, behavioral health, and theology, the course will also be of interest to any student who wants to learn more about perinatal death, dying and bereavement, and what this means in different perinatal contexts.

    19:910:533 Special Topics in Social Work Research: Social Justice and Public Health

    This course explores the interplay between social and economic disadvantage, and its health consequences. It also examines how health inequalities in society affect social inequalities. Through an understanding of these bidirectional relationships, this course reinforces a unified approach to thinking about the fields of social work and public health. Such an approach is critical for social workers interested in working in health or mental health, and public health professionals interested in working in human service settings.

    19:910:533 Special Topics in Social Work Research: Social Work with Latinos

    This course examines aspects of service delivery to Hispanic populations at both the macro and micro levels. Students will develop knowledge about aspects of Latino culture that are relevant to the development of cultural competency. They will develop skills in providing evidence-based culturally relevant practices in services to this group.

  • 19:910:538 Law and Social Work

    Law in health and human services. Reading, using, and finding law. Law in practice in relation to law on the books. Topics include due process, equal protection, discrimination, confidentiality and duty to warn, child abuse, domestic violence, AIDS, sexual harassment, mental health, developmental disabilities, courtroom testimony, malpractice, and administrative liability.

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  • 19:910:539 Community Organizations

    Focuses on identifying, developing, and testing community organizing skills. Special attention given to leadership development and community analyses.

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  • 19:910:543 HBSE: Social Work with Immigrants and Refugees*

    Explores the ever-changing dimensions facing social workers who work with refugee and immigrant clients. The social work profession was founded on aiding the cultural adjustment of newcomers to the United States. Topics include becoming a refugee, the international experience before arrival in the United States, the refugee experience, cultural adjustment, culture shock, posttraumatic stress, and war and refugee trauma. Special groups will be discussed, including survivors of torture, victims of human trafficking, detainees, and asylum seekers. Special attention will be paid to family issues, intergroup conflict, and intergenerational issues. Post 9/11 issues facing refugees and immigrants will be discussed as well as the role that social workers can play in the fight against anti-immigrant policies, sanctions, and discriminatory practices. Prerequistite: 19:910:500 and 19:910:502.

    This elective meets the Human Behavior Distribution Requirement.

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  • 19:910:544 HBSE: Poverty, Inequality, Discrimination, and Public Policy

    Confronting issues of poverty and inequality is a core value of the social work profession. This course will provide students with a theoretical, empirical, and analytical understanding of poverty and inequality in the United States. Throughout the course comparisons will be made with other developed nations. Prerequisite: 19:910:500 and 19:910:502

    This elective meets the Human Behavior Distribution Requirement.

    View Syllabus (524.02 KB)
  • 19:910:545 Global Social Work and Social Development

    Explores international social work, past and present, and the application of social work to vulnerable groups within the global context of today. Students will learn about different social service delivery systems around the globe and initiatives aimed at reforming systems of care with an emphasis on developing countries. Students will explore their international career goals through the focused exploration of a specific developmental issue within a country or region of the globe.

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  • 19:910:547 HBSE: Loss Across the Lifespan*

    Addresses many types of loss that occur across the lifespan and incorporates a developmental approach to loss and grief. Prerequisite: 19:910:500 and 19:910:502.

    This elective meets the Human Behavior Distribution Requirement.

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  • 19:910:549 Latinos, Culture, Community, and Social Welfare*

    This course provides an overview of Latino peoples in the United States.  It examines concepts and theories that apply to ethnicity, racial and social identity, and acculturation as they apply to the various Hispanic groups in the United States.  It begins with brief histories of the major Hispanic groups and the political and social forces that provided the impetus for their location/relocation here.  It continues with the cultural similarities and differences among the groups.  Also to be discussed, the current social and economic condition of Hispanics and specific problems related to their status in the United States. and implications for social work.  In addition, a model of viewing Hispanic identity will be presented as a basis for social work assessment and intervention. 

  • 19:910:557 Issues in Public Organizational Management

    This course provides students in the MSW Management and Policy specialization the opportunity to further develop their knowledge and skills obtained from the two required advanced practice courses. It is also intended to appeal to students with a broad array of interests in management of public organizations and the public aspects of nonprofit and private sector organizations. Student will gain a deeper understanding of selected management issues and challenges facing public organization managers today, with emphasis on applications to management processes and structure, human side of management, and innovation and reform. Students will also be exposed to management issues in comparative context based on case studies.

  • 19:910:559 LGBTQ Issues

    This course provides foundation knowledge and general practice skills for working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) individuals. Students will gain knowledge of LGBTQ historical and political perspectives, the development of LGBTQ identity-formation, health, mental health and familial issues, and LGBTQ issues across the life span including the coming-out process. Intersectionality of race, gender, sexual orientation and gender identity will be addressed along with ethical and legal issues which impact LGBTQ individuals and their families. Students will learn how to practice with LGBTQ clients in cultural relevant ways, and resources for support and information will be identified.

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  • 19:910:560 Current Issues in Developmental Disabilities

    Prepares the social worker to be an effective practitioner in the field of developmental disabilities and examines the complexity of social issues and how they affect social work practice, including the issue of current legislation and policies.

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  • 19:910:561 Group Dynamics

    Emphasizes the study of small groups, both cognitively and experientially, by focusing on theory and research about the processes, structures, and functions of small groups as they relate to social work practice in human services. Prerequisite: 19:910:500.

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  • 19:910:562 Chronic Illness and Disability

    Examines chronic illnesses and disability among adults, focusing on the medical and psychosocial aspects of various mental and physical health conditions. This course aims to foster understanding of how social workers work with clients with chronic illness and disability, as well as their significant others, within healthcare and community systems. Also reviews relevant policies and welfare system components intended to support those with chronic illness and disability.

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  • 19:910:564 Women's Issues

    Examines women in different parts of the world; the institutional factors and values of society that impact on personal roles, status, and discrimination of women; and the social and individual problems that affect women because of their gender. Feminist theories and feminist practices that facilitate institutional and individual changes are discussed.

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  • 19:910:566 HBSE: Violence and Abuse in Adulthood*

    Examines the definitions, scope, and impact of violence and abuse in adulthood. Explores the spectrum of theories and conceptual frameworks used to explain violence. In particular, the course focuses on the prevalence, etiology, myths, and dynamics of intimate partner violence (IPV), sexual violence, trafficking, and elder abuse. Perspectives on working with both victims/survivors and perpetrators are presented, with an understanding of the role of cultural and environmental contexts. The course includes a review of the conceptual frameworks used to guide current services, interventions, prevention efforts, and policies aimed at remedying and eliminating violence in our society. A special emphasis is placed on the advocacy role of the social worker in creating social change. Prerequisite: 19:910:500 and 19:910:502.

    This elective meets the Human Behavior Distribution Requirement.

    View Syllabus (447.52 KB)
  • 19:910:567 HBSE: Violence and Abuse in Childhood*

    Examines the definitions, scope, and impact of violence and abuse in childhood. Explores the spectrum of theories and conceptual frameworks used to explain violence. In particular, the course focuses on the prevalence, etiology, myths, and dynamics of child physical abuse, childhood neglect, child sexual abuse, sibling abuse, and trafficking. Perspectives on working with both victims/survivors and perpetrators are presented, with an understanding of the role of culture and environmental context. The course includes a review of the conceptual frameworks used to guide current services, interventions, prevention efforts, and policies aimed at remedying and eliminating violence against children in our society. A special emphasis is placed on the advocacy role of the social worker in creating social change. Prerequisite: 19:910:500 and 19:910:502.

    This elective meets the Human Behavior Distribution Requirement.

    View Syllabus (405.93 KB)
  • 19:910:569 HBSE: AIDS*

    Explores the impact of HIV infection and AIDS on the individual, family, society, and institutions that provide care. Examines the political, social, legal, ethical, spiritual, and public health issues and the perspectives of people living with HIV infection and AIDS that are needed to inform practice and policy. Prerequisite: 19:910:500 and 19:910:502.

    This elective meets the Human Behavior Distribution Requirement.

    View Syllabus (81.3 KB)
  • 19:910:571 HBSE: Understanding Addictive Behaviors*

    Focuses on the etiology, prevalence, and policy implications of common addictive behaviors, including alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; pathological gambling; and compulsive overeating or sexual behavior. Students will learn to evaluate the pharmacological mechanisms of dependence, components of addiction-related behavioral change, and issues involved in prevention, intervention, and evaluation of these addictive behaviors.The course will also examine the impact of age, race, gender, social class, culture, ethnicity, spirituality, religion, sexual orientation, national origin, and physical and mental ability on patterns of addiction. Content includes major theoretical perspectives on biological, sociological, and psychological bases for addiction and the impetus for change, and an examination of the empirical evidence for various perspectives. Prerequisite: 19:910:500 and 19:910:502.

    This elective meets the Human Behavior Distribution Requirement.

    View Syllabus (296.85 KB)
  • 19:910:572 Aging Services: A Critical Perspective

    Provides an overview of older adults as a population group and of aging as a biopsychosocial process. Explores aspects of social services and health care systems intended to help individuals, families, and communities confront aging-related challenges and capitalize upon aging-related strengths.

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  • 19:910:582 Spirituality and Social Work

    Provides a framework of knowledge, values, skills, and experiences for spiritually sensitive social work. Students develop skills and insight into responding competently and ethically to diverse spiritual and religious perspectives in social work settings with individuals, organizations, and communities. Attention given to collaboration with faith-based organizations, as spirituality enters into the dimension of policy and service delivery and "secular" and "spiritual" come together to address human need in society. Attention also given to both micro and macro aspects of social work.

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  • 19:910:583 Human Sexuality for the Helping Professions

    This course is a survey of issues and attitudes associated with human sexuality. It is primarily intended for social workers and other helping professionals who currently work with clients or plan to in the future. Using a biopsychosocial perspective, emphasis will be placed on the social, cultural, familial and individual differences in sexual and reproductive attitudes, values, and behavior. Students will be introduced to common sex-related issues and to the particular concerns of various sexually oppressed groups. Information will also be provided about childhood sexual abuse and its relationship to the intimacy issues that clients typically present in direct practice.

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  • 19:910:588 Direct Practice: Theory and Models

    Introduces students to the ways that theory and evidence are used to guide intervention with individuals, families, and groups. Focuses on the ways that effective direct practice intervention must integrate different sources of knowledge: evidence (what has worked in the past with people with similar problems), theory (frames of reference for understanding how problems are generated and solved), clinical wisdom, and client preferences. Students will learn straightforward rubrics for locating and evaluating research evidence that may be used to generate intervention possibilities. Students will study and critique several key intervention theories and models (psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, family systems, group work) and apply them to case materials. Finally, the class will explore processes and problems that cut across direct practice models, such as the enhancement of change motivation. Prerequisite: 19:910:500.

    This course may only be taken by students during the generalist curriculum.

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Advanced Electives

*also meets one of the distribution requirements

Course

  • 19:910:513 Clinical Social Work: Adolescents*

    The physical, psychological, social, and cultural dimensions of adolescence in today's culture, with focus on advanced direct practice with typical problems of adolescents. Particular attention paid to high-risk groups. Pre- or corequisite: 19:910:511.

    This elective meets the Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement for the Clinical Social Work specialization.

    View Syllabus (288.99 KB)
  • 19:910:516 Clinical Social Work: Health*

    Problem-solving model of direct practice is applied at an advanced level for individuals, families, and groups in health care and health care settings. Skills of crisis intervention, case management, and discharge planning are addressed. Explores professional practice as part of an interdisciplinary team. Prerequisite: Successful completion of generalist curriculum courses.

    This elective meets the Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement for the Clinical Social Work specialization.

    View Syllabus (560.63 KB)
  • 19:910:517 Clinical Social Work: Mental Health*

    Contemporary interventions with clients who have severe psychiatric disorders and their families, in institutional and community settings. Intervention techniques with the more severe and chronic forms of psychiatric disorder, as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR); psychotropic medications; case management; the treatment orientations to care; and special issues in work with children and adolescents. Pre- or corequisite: 19:910:511.

    This elective meets the Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement for the Clinical Social Work specialization.

    View Syllabus (347.94 KB)
  • 19:910:518 Clinical Social Work: Children*

    Focuses on children (ages birth to 18), and the ways their development and circumstance as a dependent population affect the well-being of individuals and communities. As children generally reside in families, various family forms and risk statuses will be examined with a focus on anti-oppressive social work practice. Emphasis is on assessment of developmental aspects of child well-being and aspects of family well-being (with a broad and diverse definition of family); identification of risks, strengths, and resiliency factors; and sociological and psychological knowledge of how family and community contexts affect children. Intervention modalities include direct work with children and their families, case management, promotion of resilience, crisis intervention work with community service systems, and the use of the legal system. Pre- or corequisite: 19:910:511.

    This elective meets the Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement for the Clinical Social Work specialization.

    View Syllabus (535.1 KB)
  • 19:910:519 Clinical Social Work: Families*

    Advanced practice with family systems, with emphasis on a systems-analytical perspective that includes environing systems, as well as internal dynamics of the family system. Differential use of the major theoretical approaches in family therapy. Emphasis on a social work framework and on such traditional family social work techniques as advocacy, brokerage, and provision of concrete services. Pre- or corequisite: 19:910:511.

    This elective meets the Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement for the Clinical Social Work specialization.

    View Syllabus (226.87 KB)
  • 19:910:520 Clinical Social Work: School*

    Clinical Social Work with children and adolescents, in the context of the public school setting, individually, in groups, and with their families. Emphasis on the role of the school social worker in a host setting that is bound by governmental statutes and regulations, and on relationships with teachers and school administrators, with other members of the professional team, and with community agencies and groups. Pre- or corequisite: 19:910:511.

    This elective meets the Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement for the Clinical Social Work specialization.

    View Syllabus (540.92 KB)
  • 19:910:521 Clinical Social Work: Addictive Behaviors*

    A continuation of content taught in 19:910:571, this course focuses on various approaches to the evaluation, intervention, measurement, treatment, and relapse prevention of common addictive disorders, including those resulting from substance misuse, problem gambling, and compulsive overeating or sexual behavior. Evaluation of the biopsychosocial etiological factors that bear on the formation of addictive behavior patterns, as well as erroneous thinking patterns and cognitive triggers that lead to habituating these patterns over time. Instructs students on utilizing measures for screening, conducting diagnostic evaluations using motivational interviewing and stages of change, formulating a treatment plan, and conducting session-by-session treatment for various DSM-IV-TR-based addictive disorders. Students will also learn necessary components for post-treatment relapse prevention and considerations in pretreatment intervention. Examines the impact of age, race, gender, social class, culture, ethnicity, spirituality, religion, sexual orientation, national origin, and physical and mental ability on recovery from addictive disorders. Prerequisites: 19:910:571, and pre- or corequisite: 19:910:511.

    This elective meets the Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement for the Clinical Social Work specialization.

  • 19:910:523 Clinical Social Work: Survivors of Abuse and Trauma*

    This course examines social work practice theories and intervention approaches and skills as they apply to practice with childhood and adult survivors of physical, sexual and other forms of abuse and trauma. Particular attention will be made to the use of engagement, assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation and follow up on the micro, mezzo, and macro levels of practice. An emphasis will also be placed on diversity and use of social work ethics and values when working with survivors of abuse and trauma. Prerequisite: Successful completion of generalist curriculum courses.

    This elective meets the Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement for the Clinical Social Work specialization.

    View Syllabus (354.44 KB)
  • 19:910:525 Clinical Social Work: Aging*

    Examines social work practice theories, multidimensional assessment, and intervention approaches and skills as they apply to practice with older adults and their families. Diversity among older people will be emphasized, including discussion of the lifelong integration of personal experiences and client populations that range from well elders to older adults and their families who are facing end-of-life issues. Late-life opportunities, transitions, and challenges will be addressed. Implications for policy that impacts older persons will also be included. Prerequisite: Successful completion of generalist curriculum courses.

    This elective meets the Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement for the Clinical Social Work specialization.

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  • 19:910:528 Human Resource Management*

    Core theories, dynamics, functions, and ethics of human resource management in nonprofit and public human services organizations are analyzed with particular focus on the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to successfully recruit, retain, and develop the workforce necessary to achieve the mission of an organization. The substantive areas covered in this course include industry standard human resource policies and procedures in the areas of staff recruitment and selection; developing classification and compensation systems; establishing employee performance standards and conducting performance evaluations; developing and supporting a diverse workforce; employee and organized labor relations; maintaining a safe, discrimination- and harassment-free workplace; training and professional development; and strategic human resource planning. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses.

    This elective meets the Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement for the Management and Policy specialization.

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  • 19:910:529 HBSE: Adolescents at Risk*

    Explores the developmental stage of adolescence (from ages 12-19 years), with specific focus on how at-risk youth populations navigate the normative tasks associated with this stage. Attention given to understanding vulnerable youth populations and how social workers can help identify those in at-risk situations and how micro, mezzo, and macro resources can be implemented to ameliorate or minimize the harm within a developmental context associated with involvement in an at-risk category. Policy implications related to at-risk groups will also be explored. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses.

    This elective meets the Human Behavior Distribution Requirement.

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  • 19:910:530 Solution Focused Therapy

    Students learn to apply this strength-based, brief model of treatment to assist adults, children, couples, and families to discover their own resilience and problem-solving abilities. Although the focus of this course will be on clinical practice, implications for case management, as well as intervening with larger systems such as agencies and communities, will also be addressed. Pre- or corequisite: 19:910:511.

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  • 19:910:534 Child Welfare Management

    Core theories, dynamics, functions, policies, and ethics associated with the management of private and public child welfare services are analyzed and examined with particular focus on the knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary to successfully lead organizations providing such services in the environment of today and the future. Emphasis is on the adaptation of generic external (public and community relations, media, and legislative relations, etc.) skills to the child welfare setting and specific issues associated with the management of child welfare functions, such as foster care and adoption, residential care, family preservation, forensic investigations in intrafamilial and institutional settings, legal affairs, programs treating co-occurring disorder, and others. Pre- or corequisites: 19:910:511, or 19:910:535.

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  • 19:910:537 Financial Management*

    Overview of fiscal responsibilities of social agency executives. The accounting process, financial statements, budgeting, internal controls, audits, tax compliance, and fund accounting. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses.

    This elective meets the Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement for the Management and Policy specialization.

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  • 19:910:540 Supervision and Consultation*

    Analysis of supervisory roles in human service organizations. Covers the three functions of supervision: supportive, educational, and administrative. Emphasis on frontline supervision. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses.

    This elective meets the Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement for the Management and Policy specialization.

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  • 19:910:541 Fundraising and Marketing*

    Introduction to current strategies and procedures for identifying, obtaining, and maintaining a diverse portfolio of social service funding sources; review of methodologies for packaging, marketing, and selling program proposals to social service funders and consumers. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses.

    This elective meets the Advanced Practice Distribution Requirement for the Management and Policy specialization.

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  • 19:910:550 Play Therapy

    This course will cover elements of play therapy, which consists of the systematic use of theoretical models to establish an interpersonal process wherein social workers use the therapeutic powers of play to help children prevent or resolve psychosocial challenges and achieve optimal growth and development. The course is grounded in knowledge about trauma and will consist of basic principles of intervention as well as guidelines for assessment and treatment of traumatized children. Expressive therapies such as art, play genograms and other nonverbal and symbolic techniques which enable children to externalize and process overwhelming experiences in a nonthreatening way will be covered. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the generalist curriculum courses.

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