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Policy Updates from the Rutgers Social Work Policy Network
April 28, 2021

Today, the Social Work Policy Network offers a glimpse of their weekly e-updates.
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NATIONAL UPDATES
An Equitable Recovery Needs Investments in Connecting People Leaving Jail or Prison to Health Care, CBPP: "Greater funding for reentry supports is needed to promote more equitable outcomes for people with a history of incarceration, along with investments in workforce development... rental assistance, and other social services."

Biden Admin Plans to Help 34 Million Kids Losing School Lunches in Summertime, Truthout: "The plan could reach as many as 34 million children across the U.S. It would provide $375 for the duration of the 10 weeks of summer when they’re not in school, equivalent to around $7.50 per weekday (slightly more than the $6.82 per weekday that qualifying families would ordinarily receive through supplemental lunch programs). According to the department, this will be the largest summer food program in the history of the U.S."

Here's How The 1st 2020 Census Results Changed Electoral College, House Seats, NPR: Review population figures from states around the U.S. And, learn how increased or decreased state population size will impact state representation.

LOCAL & REGIONAL UPDATES
N.J. population tops 9.2M as state will keep its 12 congressional seats, census shows, NJ.com: "New Jersey’s population grew by almost 500,000 people in the last decade, enough for the state to keep all 12 of its congressional seats, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures released Monday. The 2020 Census put the state’s population at 9,288,994, up 497,100, or 6%, over the 2010 figure of 8,791,894."

New Jersey set to open up driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants, joining more than a dozen states, USA Today: On May 1, 2021, "New Jersey will join 15 other states and the District of Columbia in offering licenses to non-citizens regardless of legal status. The group includes New York, Connecticut, Maryland, Delaware and California, among other states."

NJ to bake climate change risk into policies, share costs, WHYY-NPR: "New Jersey will incorporate the impacts of climate change and rising seas into all its major policy decisions in the near future, and will seek to share the costs of protecting the state among all levels of government and the private sector."

UPCOMING EVENTS
Police Violence in the U.S. What we Know & How to Move Forward
Apr 28 (11:00 AM EST via Zoom) - Free. Registration Required.
"Join Rutgers School of Social Work for a discussion on police violence in the United States and how we can continue to engage in conversation and strive towards promoting social and racial justice."

2021 Conference on Environmental Justice with Adelphi University and the Institute for Social Work and Environmental Justice.
April 28 (9AM - 4PM EST via Zoom) - Free for Current Students. Fee for Continuing Education Credits. Registration Required.
“Environmental justice is the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people, regardless of race, color, or national origin. The populations social workers aim to serve are often the most vulnerable and face the worst effects of natural disasters and environmental degradation, requiring meaningful interventions at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels of practice and scholarship."

Progress 2021: Meeting the Moment
April 29 (12:00 PM EST via Zoom) - Free. Registration Required.
“Join NJPP for the first session of our Progress 2021 virtual speaker series as we explore ways to advance racial equity in the nation's pandemic response. This virtual discussion, moderated by NJPP President Brandon McKoy, will feature Eddie S. Glaude Jr., Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman (NJ-12), and Governor Phil Murphy.”

MEDIA OF THE WEEK
Biased Intelligence
: AI systems can be highly susceptible to bias. The potential for serious consequences is huge, especially when it comes to the AI increasingly used in police departments. We’ll hear from a man wrongfully arrested due to facial recognition technology, and from a lawyer researching how “dirty data” has corrupted predictive policing algorithms…

 

 

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